A black man's son has been shot dead by California police for $ 1.3 million in a lawsuit

Kenneth Ross Jr., 25, was shot dead by a Gardena police officer in 2018. His death led to the enactment of a law that would give power to police

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The eight-year-old son of a black California man who was shot dead by police in 2018, a death that led to new police rules, will receive $ 1.3 million in settlement cases with the town of Gardena, his lawyers have announced.

Kenneth Ross Jr. he was 25 years old when he was shot by police in response to phone calls about a man who was shooting a weapon in a park on April 11, 2018, Gardena police said at the time.

Kenneth Ross Jr.

Kenneth Ross Jr.Courtesy Fouzia Almarou

Gardena police officer Michael Robbins said he "feared for his life," believing Ross wanted a gun, and shot him twice. A firearm was found at the scene.

The Los Angeles County attorney's office concluded in 2019 that Robbins acted in "legal defense." Robbins retired in 2020.

Attorneys Carl Douglas and Jamon Hicks, representing Ross's son, announced the deal Wednesday.

Hicks told NBC News that the Gardena Police Department had not admitted any wrongdoing in the case, however, "for a total of more than $ 1.3 million, we believe that speaks volumes."

Last month, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed Kenneth Ross Jr. Police Decertification Act 2021, also known as SB2. The law authorizes law enforcement officials arrested for misconduct or serious crimes - such as excessive use of force or bias - and prohibits them from going to various police departments.

The family hailed the law as a major victory in police response.

"Today's vote is proof that if we fight, we win," Ross' mother, Fouzia Almarou, said in a statement at the time. “No mother should live with this kind of pain that I live with every day. This law gives us the power to authorize police officers to kill and torture our people. "

Hicks said with the amendment and the new law, "we are happy with what the future holds for us, and what Mr Ross' legacy will be. One of those disasters was turned into something good."

"We believe it's a good solution," Hicks said. "The agreement, in conjunction with the previous SB2, feels that there will be more accountability to California officials and their inability to move from station to station or door-to-door."

"The family is very grateful to all the people who have kept his name alive among all the other genocides across the country," Hicks said. "Family, the mother of her young son is very happy that people did not give up and forgot about Kenneth Ross."

Ross's mother and father also settled separately from the city in small numbers.

The Gardena City Police Department and Gardena did not immediately respond to NBC News' request for comment.