American judge withholds punishment for Navy SEALs who refused to strike

Thirty-five members of the special group have refused to be vaccinated against coronavirus for religious reasons, despite President Biden

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source: https://ibb.co/0MNPC9D

A federal judge on Monday banned the U.S. Department of Defense from punishing a group of Navy SEALs and other special members who rejected COVID-19 policies on religious grounds.

U.S. Regional Judge Reed O’Connor, in response to a lawsuit filed on behalf of 35 special forces members, issued the first proclamation barring the Ministry of Defense and Defense from exercising its powers.

O'Connor, who was appointed to the state bench in Texas by President George W. Bush, said the Navy had not provided a single religious exemption from vaccination law.

"Navy personnel in this case want to protect the very freedom they have so much to protect. The COVID-19 epidemic does not give the government permission to violate that freedom," the judge wrote in a 26-page decision.

The members of the service were subjected to a series of military coup d'état.

The First Liberty Institute, a legal corporation dedicated to the protection of religious freedom in the U.S. representing the members of the plaintiffs' ministry, commended the decision as a victory.

"Forcing a member of the church to choose between his or her faith and service to his or her country is detestable to the Constitution and American principles," Mike Berry, the institution's general adviser, said in a written statement.

Pentagon officials were not immediately available for comment from Reuters on Monday evening.

The decision marks the latest salvo in a series of legal battles over Covid-19 vaccination directives ordered by President Joe Biden that have proved to be a major issue among conservationists.

"Navy personnel in this case want to protect the very freedom they have so much to protect. The COVID-19 epidemic does not give the government permission to violate that freedom," the judge wrote in a 26-page decision.

The members of the service were subjected to a series of military coup d'état.

The First Liberty Institute, a legal corporation dedicated to the protection of religious freedom in the U.S. representing the members of the plaintiffs' ministry, commended the decision as a victory.

"Forcing a member of the church to choose between his or her faith and service to his or her country is detestable to the Constitution and American principles," Mike Berry, the institution's general adviser, said in a written statement.