As Trump tries to shape the 2022 camps, this is where he intervenes the most

First Read your information from "Meet the Press" and the Political Unit about the most important political issues of the day and why they are important

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No modern president has ever played a heavier hand in his party's primaries after leaving office than Donald Trump.

And no one - as a result - is in serious danger if his party wins or loses.

The latest example of Trump’s tough hand: Georgia’s new gubernatorial war between GOP Gov Brian Kemp and former Sen. David Perdue, R-Ga., Where Trump endorses Perdue immediately after entering the race on Monday.

Here are - so far - the top five GOP primaries of the GOP in the Senate, the governor and the House that we will be following in 2022:

North Carolina Senate (March 8)

Trump has already authorized Rep. Ted Budd over former Governor Pat McCrory in the race to replace retired GOP senator Richard Burr. And Politico reported over the weekend that Trump made a deal to get Rep. Mark Walker to finalize his Senate request to clear the stadium from Budd.

Meanwhile, the Club for Growth Action has released a new TV commercial broadcasting McCrory: "Pat McCrory has called Romney a 'man of extraordinary courage.' But about Trump: 'Donald Trump is undermining democracy.'"

(By the way, when McCrory praised Romney for being "an incredibly brave man," he said in 2012 when Romney was elected president of the GOP, and we remember Trump approving Romney at the time.)

Alabama Senate (May 24)

Trump authorizes Rep. Mo Brooks, who spoke at the Jan meeting. 6, in the race to replace Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala.

Shelby, however, is reportedly spending $ 5 million on his campaign fundraiser to upgrade Katie Britt, his former chief of staff.

Governor of Georgia (May 24)

The aforementioned Kemp-vs.-Perdue foundation seems to be based on one issue: Kemp supports President Biden's 2020 victory in Georgia.

"Unfortunately, today, we are divided, and Brian Kemp and Brad Raffensperger are guilty," Perdue said in a video announcement. "Instead of defending our election, [Kemp] relied on [Stacey] Abrams and called us two Senate seats."

What Perdue did not say: He was one of two Republicans who lost those Senate seats.

One thing he did not say: Who officially won in 2020.

The GOP primary secretary of state will also be interesting to watch.

Wyoming at-large (Aug. 16)

This key should be very personal to Trump. Includes Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo. - who voted for Trump's dismissal and served on the January 6 House committee - and Trump's Harriet Hageman.

After Hageman entered the race and was approved by Trump, Cheney wrote on Twitter: "Bring it."

That same day Cheney received his biggest challenge, as did Seni Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, who voted to dismiss Trump in his charge.

Candidate Kelly Tshibaka, Trump has endorsed him and his campaign has staff, in part, members of the Trump World.

Create a Back Back Better timeline for the Obamacare conference right now

Another sign from Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.V., That the Senate Democrats will probably not pass their “Build Back Better” social spending bill before Christmas, here's something special.

Democrats will be following Obamacare's passing as Build Back Better moves after Christmas in the Senate.

Over the past decade, there have been many Democrats' complaints about how long Obamacare's passing lasts. But look at this comparison:

When Obamacare passed the House for the first time: Nov. 7, 2009

When Build Back Better first passed the House: Nov. 17, 2021

When Obamacare first approved Senate: Dec. 24, 2009

When Build Back Better first passed the Senate: ???

Of course, Obama did not sign the Affordable Care Act into law until March 2010 - because Democrats lost that Massachusetts Senate race, which ended its 60-member Senate seat.

So the last episode of Build Back Better might go ahead at that point. But not so much.

Data Download: Numbers you need to know today

More than 400: Number of Capitol Hill staff members who have signed a petition calling on the House leadership to "completely reject" Rep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., About Ilhan Omar Omar, D-Minn of Minnesota. The Washington Post reports that Rep. Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., Presented the decision to dismiss Boebert and strip him of his committee assignments.

60 Percent: Part of the increase in Covid sleep in America from only six states (Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, Pennsylvania, New York and Illinois).

49,412,048: Number of confirmed cases of coronavirus in the United States, according to the latest data from NBC News and health officials. (That is another 117,922 as of yesterday morning.)

794,340: The number of deaths in the United States from the virus so far, according to the latest data from NBC News. (1,766 from yesterday morning.)

473,243,228: Total number of vaccines administered in the U.S., according to each CDC. (1,542,785 from yesterday morning.)

47,866,620: Number of booster vaccines administered in the U.S., according to each CDC. (826,861 from yesterday morning.)

60.1 percent: The proportion of all Americans fully vaccinated, according to each CDC.

71.6 percent: The proportion of all Americans 18 years and older who are fully vaccinated, according to each CDC.