Covid lawsuits in the U.S. They fall to unseen levels from March 2020

As a result of the vaccine, experts say, the U.S. It is unlikely to see a summer eruption on the same scale as last year.

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Confirmed cases of coronavirus in the United States have dropped to undetectable levels since March 2020, according to an analysis - and experts say they expect the number of cases to remain low in the summer.

The charges first surfaced in March last year, driven by a wave in New York City. That first explosion occurred in April, gradually declining to an average of seven days of 19,000 cases on June 1, 2020 - and will not fall below that limit next year. On Wednesday, the average for seven days was 16,860, the lowest number since March 29, 2020.

Last June, many officials had lifted their spring restrictions, confident that the entire country would not see the explosion as much as in the Northeast. It was not: Infection erupted in the South and West last summer, and the U.S. It had a severe winter blast, with more than 300,000 daily cases at the top.

Winter growth has now slowed down, and with the calendar turning to June, the country has reopened. But the epidemic has changed dramatically in the last 12 months. As a result of the vaccine, experts say, the U.S. It is unlikely to see a summer eruption on the same scale as last year.

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"The level of immunization in the country is off the table," said Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota.

Bill Hanage, a cold medicine specialist at Harvard T.H. The Chan School of Public Health, had a similar test.

"We expect the summer to be quiet compared to the combination of high vaccination rates, a certain amount of protection against infection, and the time of year," he said.

Hanage noted that the current census could be down for the weekend, where a number of cases were reported. As those cases come in, more is expected, but he hopes the full trend will continue.

However, both Osterholm and Hanage said that in areas with low immunization rates, there may be outbreaks in many areas.

Countries start vaccination programs. Track the number of inococos across the country.

Some states, such as Texas, have more "critical" immunizations, "said Hanage, with some state areas having very high immunization rates. In these low-vaccination areas, there will continue to be a risk of outbreaks

Countries start vaccination programs. Track the number of inococos across the country.

And outbreaks can occur in areas with high coverage, too.

"Even if 90 percent of people in the community are vaccinated, if 10 percent do not live together, and then the virus is silenced, a large part of them can become infected," Hanage said.

The biggest test will come in the fall, when the weather is cooler and people are starting to gather in the house, said Dr. Chris Beyrer, professor of pathology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The virus is easily spread to indoor, airtight areas.

However, Hanage noted, any fall or high winter would not be the same as the increase seen by the nation last winter, as vaccines have been shown to be very effective in preventing serious diseases. That means an increase in cases will not lead to a significant increase in hospital admissions seen in previous surges, he said.

What happened last fall, Beyrer said, depends on the American people.

"We need to learn as much about these dreaded vaccines as possible, as that is the key to whether or not we fall further when we see outbreaks and infections," he said.