INDIAN Goverment wants WhatsApp privacy policy banned

the new privacy policy does not allow for the review or amendment of full information submitted by the user

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source: https://ibb.co/CWnPyn1

The government also told the court that the new privacy policy does not allow for the review or amendment of full information submitted by the user, noting that the changes allowed are limited to name, photo, mobile number and "personal" information.

The dispute involved the company's decision in January to enforce a new privacy policy that would allow it to share certain information about users' interactions with business accounts with its parent company Facebook, and that acceptance of these terms was mandatory for use of the app. (Reuters)

The Union government on Friday called on the Delhi Supreme Court to ban WhatsApp from implementing its new privacy policy, arguing that the rules were vague, failed to protect user data from sharing with third parties, and did not guarantee the removal of all data when users retrieved their information. permission

Chief Justice DN Patel and Justice Jasmeet were told by the Center in an affidavit that although laws enacted in 2011 under the Information Technology Act prohibit sharing information with third parties, WhatsApp said information and information would be freely shared and accepted by other Facebook-owned companies.

It said no information was provided about third parties to share information, and sent that since the user contract is for WhatsApp only, all other Facebook companies are "third parties" and any data allocation between them is a violation of the law.

The trial is set to begin on April 20.

“WhatsApp has reported that information and information will be freely shared and shared with other Facebook companies. Since the user contract is only on WhatsApp, all other Facebook companies are ‘third parties’ and any sharing of information obtained by them would be a violation of the disclosure of further disclosure, ”he added.

The dispute coincides with the company's decision in January to enforce a new privacy policy that would allow it to share certain information about user interactions and business accounts with its parent company Facebook, and that acceptance of these terms was mandatory for use of the app.

WhatsApp has been plagued by critics who say users will now have no choice but to accept the offer if they want to continue using the system. The company postponed the release of the policy on May 15 but also announced in February that it would continue with its decision. This happened despite the government having written a letter, asking the company to abandon its plans.

In an affidavit, the government also told the court that the new privacy policy does not allow for the review or amendment of full user information, indicating that permitted changes are limited to name, photo, cell phone number and "about" information.

“The privacy policy is completely silent on the modification / amendment of information. It appears to offer the option to continue to manage, modify, restrict or delete your policy information, but upon closer inspection, this capability is limited to a user profile, photo, mobile number and information about this. In order for the policy to comply with the Rules, it must allow users to apply this option to all types of data collected by WhatsApp specified in the policy. Such a confidential privacy policy fails to meet these obligations, ”the affidavit said.

WhatsApp did not respond to requests for comment.

The Center's response came from Seema Singh's request through Meghan's attorney, challenging the new WhatsApp privacy policy. The request required the authorities to provide an option to opt out of sharing information with Facebook.

Responding to a response from the Union government, attorney Meghan said: "Three rights have been prayed for before the court to be declared an authority not mentioned in the affidavit." The three were entitled to claim confirmation, access and correction; objections, restrictions and confidentiality of information; and that you have forgotten as part of Article 21 and the inside of the right to privacy.

He further added that the government has not yet implemented a proposal to protect user privacy. "How to protect the privacy of a citizen at that time has also not been followed in this affidavit," he added.

The institute cited the IT Act of 2011 to argue that the revised privacy policy fails to specify the types of “sensitive personal” information that is collected, and with whom information is shared.

The government has said that, in accordance with the law, WhatsApp is required to define "personal" and "sensitive personal information", but WhatsApp has used common terms to include data types, and has not distinguished between "personal" data or "sensitive" data.

According to the 2011 law, there are eight categories of information that qualify as sensitive personal data, including user passwords, financial instruments and transaction information, and biometrics information.

On January 15, a law student, Chaitanya Rohilla, also challenged a new privacy policy. WhatsApp initially forced users to accept the terms on February 8.

The Delhi High Court, while hearing Rohilla's application, on January 18 found that WhatsApp was a private application, and it was not compulsory for people to download it if they had a problem with its privacy policy.

A WhatsApp spokesman also said the proposed update "does not extend" the company's ability to share information with Facebook. “As we said in January when this issue was first raised: we wish to emphasize that this update does not enhance our ability to share information with Facebook. Our goal is to provide transparency and new options available to engage businesses so that they can serve their customers and grow. WhatsApp will always protect personal messages with end-to-end encryption