Joe Biden signed a law banning imports from China's Xinjiang region over human rights abuses.

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source: www.cnbc.com

Joe Biden signed a law banning imports from China's Xinjiang region over human rights abuses.

The rule seeks to punish labor exploitation and state-run detention camps where the Uighur minority and other Muslim communities are subjected.

The president of the United States, Joe Biden, signed the law that prohibits imports from the Chinese region of Xinjiang on Thursday, requiring manufacturing companies to demonstrate that their products are not manufactured in the context of labor exploitation to pass through customs. Americans.

Xinjiang is a resource-rich mining region, essential for agricultural production, and home to a booming industrial sector. According to the United States, detainees are also transferred out of Xinjiang and put to work in factories, including garment and textile, electronics, solar energy, and automotive sectors.

Last week, the Senate had approved and sent to the White House the measure aimed at curbing the conditions of forced labor of ethnic minorities by the campaigns of the Chinese regime.

The United States cites raw cotton, gloves, tomato products, silicon and viscose, fishing gear, and several components of solar energy among the goods that have allegedly been produced with the help of forced labor.

The legislation requires government agencies to expand their vigilance on forced labor by ethnic minorities in China. Most importantly, it creates the presumption that products from Xinjiang are made by forced labor. Companies will have to prove that forced labor, including workers transferred from Xinjiang, has not intervened in a product to bring it into the United States.

Xinjiang is a resource-rich mining region, essential for agricultural production, and home to a booming industrial sector. According to the United States, detainees are also transferred out of Xinjiang and put to work in factories, including garment and textile, electronics, solar energy, and automotive sectors.

Human rights groups have reported unprecedented surveillance of the Muslim-majority Uighurs in the Xinjiang region, including DNA tracing and artificial intelligence operations to recognize and monitor faces.

Activists, witnesses, and the US government say more than a million Uighurs and other Muslims are being held captive in concentration camps in an attempt to uproot them from their Islamic traditions and assimilate them by force.

Beijing describes these sites as vocational training centers and says its goal is to reduce the risk of Islamic radicalism spreading after a series of deadly attacks.