Kamala Harris asked Guatemala to work together to stop migration to the United States.

Kamala%20Harris%20asked%20Guatemala%20to%20work%20together%20to%20stop%20migration%20to%20the%20United%20States.
source: usatoday.com

During her visit to the Central American country, the North American vice president indicated that migrants generally "are fleeing some damage or simply cannot satisfy their basic needs by staying at home."

"We know that many people do not want to leave home" and that they do so because "they cannot meet their basic needs ." Thus, in the framework of her tour of Central America, the Vice President of the United States, Kamala Harris, asked Guatemala to work together to address the causes that drive the migration to her country.

On his first international tour, Harris began the day with a meeting with the president of Guatemala, Alejandro Giammattei. He reiterated the priority that the Joe Biden administration gives to the region.

The Vice President of North America said, 

I am here in Guatemala to discuss and promote our shared priorities, the most important of which, as you [Giammattei] mentioned, is migration and specifically to address the region.

It's in our collective interest to work together where we can find solutions to long-standing problems," Harris said at the National Palace of Culture, a former government house in the center of the capital.

For the vice president, most people don't want to leave home; they don't want to leave their grandmother's upbringing, where they pray, where they speak their language, and know their culture.

Harris considered that those who migrate, or "are fleeing some harm or simply cannot meet their basic needs by staying at home, cannot simply meet the needs they have to raise their children by staying at home."

Therefore, he reiterated, it is important, as leaders, to give people" a sense of hope, that aid is on the way" in a region hard hit by COVID-19, violence, and poverty, a situation that is aggravated in 2020 by the passage of two hurricanes.

"Hope does not exist by itself. It must be accompanied by relationships of trust, with tangible results in terms of what we do as leaders to convince people that there is a reason to be hopeful about their future", he added.

For his part, Giammattei offered Harris " a country that wants to cooperate, that wants to join forces, a country of opportunities, still."

Building these opportunities will prevent the migration of young people who want to leave us and allow us to create conditions in Guatemala so that they can find the hope that they do not have today.

Giammattei considered that the problems in his country are "the product of many years of delay." "We need to create in the minds of Guatemalans that possibility of generating hope that this is where they have to fight to build the country and not fight to risk their lives to go to other countries like the United States," he said.

At Monday's bilateral meeting, Giammattei and a large part of his cabinet were present for Guatemala, including the interior ministers (Gendri Reyes), defense (Juan Carlos Alemán), and foreign relations (Pedro Bravo).

Kamala Harris, meanwhile, was accompanied by US Ambassador to Guatemala William Popp. Nancy  McEldowney, Government Security Assistant The White House Special Envoy for the Central American North Triangle, Ricardo Zega, and the Western Hemisphere Assistant to the Government, and Special Assistant John Gonzalez.

After an interview with Giammattei, Harris will meet with community leaders elsewhere south of the Guatemalan capital.

He will later talk with business leaders about investment and development initiatives.

The vice president's tour is tied to Biden'sBiden's promise of a more "humane" immigration policy following a tough approach from his predecessor, Donald Trump.

But Harris faces even more complex challenges than Biden encountered when, as Barack Obama'sObama's vice president, he was in charge of the same issue. This year, more than 200,000 attempts by migrants from the area to enter the United States.

In the United States, according to official figures, there are more than three million Guatemalans, most of whom are in dire straits, and at least 300,000 people each year go to the North without documents in search of better housing—trying to reach the American people.

During her visit to the Central American country, the North American vice president indicated that migrants generally "are fleeing some damage or simply cannot satisfy their basic needs by staying at home."

"We know that many people do not want to leave home" and that they do so because "they cannot meet their basic needs ." Thus, in the framework of her tour of Central America, the Vice President of the United States, Kamala Harris, asked Guatemala to work together to address the causes that drive the migration to her country.

On his first international tour, Harris began the day with a meeting with the president of Guatemala, Alejandro Giammattei. He reiterated the priority that the Joe Biden administration gives to the region.

The Vice President of North America said, 

I am here in Guatemala to discuss and promote our shared priorities, the most important of which, as you [Giammattei] mentioned, is migration and specifically to address the region.

It's in our collective interest to work together where we can find solutions to long-standing problems," Harris said at the National Palace of Culture, a former government house in the center of the capital.

For the vice president, most people don't want to leave home; they don't want to leave their grandmother's upbringing, where they pray, where they speak their language, and know their culture.

Harris considered that those who migrate, or "are fleeing some harm or simply cannot meet their basic needs by staying at home, cannot simply meet the needs they have to raise their children by staying at home."

Therefore, he reiterated, it is important, as leaders, to give people" a sense of hope, that aid is on the way" in a region hard hit by COVID-19, violence, and poverty, a situation that is aggravated in 2020 by the passage of two hurricanes.

"Hope does not exist by itself. It must be accompanied by relationships of trust, with tangible results in terms of what we do as leaders to convince people that there is a reason to be hopeful about their future", he added.

For his part, Giammattei offered Harris " a country that wants to cooperate, that wants to join forces, a country of opportunities, still."

Building these opportunities will prevent the migration of young people who want to leave us and allow us to create conditions in Guatemala so that they can find the hope that they do not have today.

Giammattei considered that the problems in his country are "the product of many years of delay." "We need to create in the minds of Guatemalans that possibility of generating hope that this is where they have to fight to build the country and not fight to risk their lives to go to other countries like the United States," he said.

At Monday's bilateral meeting, Giammattei and a large part of his cabinet were present for Guatemala, including the interior ministers (Gendri Reyes), defense (Juan Carlos Alemán), and foreign relations (Pedro Bravo).

Kamala Harris, meanwhile, was accompanied by US Ambassador to Guatemala William Popp. Nancy  McEldowney, Government Security Assistant The White House Special Envoy for the Central American North Triangle, Ricardo Zega, and the Western Hemisphere Assistant to the Government, and Special Assistant John Gonzalez.

After an interview with Giammattei, Harris will meet with community leaders elsewhere south of the Guatemalan capital.

He will later talk with business leaders about investment and development initiatives.

The vice president's tour is tied to Biden'sBiden's promise of a more "humane" immigration policy following a tough approach from his predecessor, Donald Trump.

But Harris faces even more complex challenges than Biden encountered when, as Barack Obama'sObama's vice president, he was in charge of the same issue. This year, more than 200,000 attempts by migrants from the area to enter the United States.

In the United States, according to official figures, there are more than three million Guatemalans, most of whom are in dire straits, and at least 300,000 people each year go to the North without documents in search of better housing—trying to reach the American people.