Opponents of Texas abortion law have asked the Supreme Court to speed up their challenge

Abortion providers argue that Texas officials and the state appeals court are standing.

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The Supreme Court last month dismissed Texas's claim that a law known as S.B. 8 was not immune to the challenges of the state court, but the decision limited legal opponents to sue government medical licensing officials. That meant that abortion therapists in Texas would only want to prevent those officials from taking their medical licenses.

The ruling also said opponents could not block a very new aspect of Texas law, which allows anyone to sue an abortion provider and demand a minimum of $ 10,000.

The Supreme Court last month remanded the case to the 5th U.S. District Court. Appeal. Now, abortion providers say the case is still pending and should be returned to the state judge in Texas so that they can continue their legal challenge.

Texas has asked the appellate court to consider what it says about legal questions about abortion providers' ability to sue licensing officials. Proponents of her case have been working to make the actual transcript of this statement available online.

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"The Fifth Circuit has no outstanding issues to be resolved in its application and has no jurisdiction to maintain jurisdiction," the agency's lawyers told the Supreme Court, adding that Texas "has no right to a second apple bite."

At present, thousands of Texans "have not been able to exercise their constitutional right to abort," the lawyers said.

The Supreme Court may seek a response in Texas before taking any action on the application

The Supreme Court last month dismissed Texas's claim that a law known as S.B. 8 was not immune to the challenges of the state court, but the decision limited legal opponents to sue government medical licensing officials. That meant that abortion therapists in Texas would only want to prevent those officials from taking their medical licenses.

The ruling also said opponents could not block a very new aspect of Texas law, which allows anyone to sue an abortion provider and demand a minimum of $ 10,000.

The Supreme Court last month remanded the case to the 5th U.S. District Court. Appeal. Now, abortion providers say the case is still pending and should be returned to the state judge in Texas so that they can continue their legal challenge.