Possible New Major Player In 2020 Elections—Maryland Certifies Socialist Party

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source: WBFF

In what is being termed the first new socialist party in four decades, the state of Maryland has officially certified a socialist party.  Having made this move, it will allow the new party to run candidates over the next two election cycles. 

The party, calling itself Bread and Roses, considers itself a viable alternative to the current traditional two-party system.  With its certification now legal, Bread and Roses will be able to offer up its own candidates for both local and state elections, including national elections as well.  It will also be legal for them to include a candidate in the 2020 and 2022 presidential elections if they so see fit.

In a statement to Fox News, University of Maryland professor Jerome Segal emphasized: “It’s a new kind of socialism.”

Last year, Segal himself conducted an unsuccessful bid as a socialist in the democratic party primary, challenging the then sitting Senator Ben Cardin.  After his defeat, he left the democratic party and collected more than 10,000 signatures on a petition.  What resulted was the state board of elections granting the certification of the socialist party.

A recent Bread and Roses press release stated: “It is believed that the new part is the first democratic socialist party to be established in the United States in the last four decades.”

It wasn’t too very long ago that many political candidates, as well as sitting members, avoided anything to do with the word socialism.  However, the party, which has been widely accepted on the left, Is being seen by more and more mainstream Democrats as a movement worth tapping into.  It is speculated the sudden increased interest is based on the parties agreeable policies and the building of support.

As detailed in The Democratic Socialists playbook, on its website, the plan is to work from within the current Democratic establishment, with the goal of becoming a force of national scope.  To this end, they will achieve this goal through the running of party candidates that will then push ideas blanketed under a socialist party banner.  

Last year this hard-won effort paid off with the congressional primary victory of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez who is seen as an ally of DSA and being hailed as the new generation of democratic leaders.

Segal is quick to remind voters that socialism embraces the tenants of free public college educations, equal distribution of wealth, and universal health care.

Is socialism indeed what is to come? Will it rise above the democratic party?