The moving gesture of solidarity of an Uruguayan rabbi in the New York subway.

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source: www.ynetnews.com

The moving gesture of solidarity of an Uruguayan rabbi in the New York subway.

Gabriel Benayon saw a barefoot person in the subway and did not hesitate to take off his shoes to give them to him.

The rabbi Uruguayan Gabriel Benayon gave a message of solidarity that surprised everyone in the subway in New York, took off his shoes, and presented them to a barefoot person.

"Precisely because I did not know what was happening to me, I suffered a lot; my experience was much more tortuous. I thought I was going crazy. I felt that my life had succumbed, that I was living a curse", he said in February of this year.

Benayon was returning from shopping in New York. Noticing the presence in the subway of a person without shoes, without hesitation, he decided to take off the ones he was wearing and give them away. "Thanks!" The lucky man told him excitedly that he couldn't get out of his astonishment.

The priest explains that he took advantage of the shopping day to buy new shoes. In the video released by the orthodox media COLlive, he reflects on why he can buy new shoes. At the same time, another person walks barefoot down the street.

"You always have to be awake. You always have to try to think what can be done for others, because if you see them in difficulty, it is to do something about it", says the rabbi.

Gabriel Benayon is Uruguayan and has lived in Panama for 20 years. It is mainly dedicated to the education of youth and adults. He is the author of the book "From my anxiety to your happiness." He describes the ordeal I experience due to anxiety disorders.

"Precisely because I did not know what was happening to me, I suffered a lot; my experience was much more tortuous. I thought I was going crazy. I felt that my life had succumbed, that I was living a curse", he said in February of this year.

Benayon, in his book, defines anxiety as a "terrible pain in the soul that seems infinitely more unbearable than any physical pain. "Hell itself on Earth," he says.