The US Congress will study laws that could break Big Tech.

The%20US%20Congress%20will%20study%20laws%20that%20could%20break%20Big%20Tech.
source: theweek.in

One of the aspects that these proposals seek to regulate even more is the practice of companies using their market power in one sector to influence another, something of which, for example, Google, Amazon, and Apple are accused.

The Congress of the United States will study several bills that propose changes in the antitrust legislation of the country, and that could have as a consequence the rupture of some of the big technology companies.

A group of congressmen, both Democrats and Republicans, presented the five bills in the House of Representatives this Friday, which must still be discussed and voted on in committee, then go to the plenary session and ultimately receive approval Lower House and in the Senate.

Although the path they have left is still very long and uncertain, they have support from both parties and the ambition of those drafted - who seem to be written specifically for firms like Google, Amazon, Apple, and Facebook - give them special relevance.

One of the aspects that these proposals seek to regulate even more is the practice of companies using their market power in one sector to influence another, something of which, for example, Google and Amazon, and Apple, are accused.

It also seeks to hinder the acquisition by these giants of small startups, something that has been a very common practice in recent years and that allows explaining stories of enormous success, such as the purchase of Instagram and WhatsApp by Facebook.

Suppose they are approved in both chambers with their current wording. In that case, the laws could force these large companies to be diluted in several companies since, for example, Amazon could not sell its products on the e-commerce platform that it operates.

The siege on big technology for alleged anti-competitive practices has tightened in recent months in the United States. Both Facebook and Google have several lawsuits filed against them by both the federal government and coalitions of several states.

In addition, at the end of May, the District of Columbia attorney general sued Amazon for allegedly preventing free competition and thereby harming the consumer, who ends up paying higher prices; while Apple is waging a battle in court against the video game developer Epic Games for the alleged monopoly of the App Store.