They indicted 16 members of a network that tried to traffic weapons and drugs between Mexico and the United States.

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source: paudal.com

They indicted 16 members of a network that tried to traffic weapons and drugs between Mexico and the United States.

Prosecutors revealed that the leaders of the criminal organization, identified as José Maldonado Ramírez, 33, and his fiancee, Iris Amador García, 30, of Bellflower, California, were arrested on October 28.

This Wednesday, November 3, federal officials in the United States revealed that 16 people were indicted in the country after a series of arrests in operation in several states against a network of methamphetamine and fentanyl distribution.

US Attorney Nick Brown reported that the drugs came from California and were sold in at least six counties in Washington state.

"Members of the network tried to trade drugs for firearms - weapons that could be transported to Mexico - contributing to the terrible violence south of the border," Brown said in a press release, the Associated Press reported. "Those arrests are a significant step for the safety of the community."

The investigations began in early

 2020, when people who worked with US law enforcement agencies provided information on drug sales. Authorities seized 4.5 kilograms of methamphetamine in May 2020 at a traffic stop and 20 kilograms at another traffic light in April 2020.

In September of 2021, federal forces seized 37.6 kilograms of methamphetamine and 20,000 pills of fentanyl.

Prosecutors revealed that the leaders of the network, identified as José Maldonado Ramírez, 33, and his fiancee, Iris Amador García, 30, of Bellflower, California, were arrested on October 28.

"The objectives of this operation were to penalize those responsible for the threat of illegal narcotics trafficking and the violence associated with it, which has plagued our communities for far too long in Washington State and throughout the Pacific Northwest," said Fran. Tarentino, a special agent for the federal drug agency.

On September 30, at a press conference, the Department of Justice of the United States of America said that fentanyl, a drug that has caused a crisis in that country, is produced so massive by cartels of the drug trade in Mexico. In this context, the US government specifically pointed to the Sinaloa Cartel and the Jalisco Nueva Generación Cartel (CJNG).

Anne Milgram was appointed head of the US Drug Enforcement Administration ( DEA ) three months ago. At a press conference, he stated that he noticed a pattern in just a couple of weeks after starting work.

"Almost daily, I learned of an overdose death linked to fentanyl," he said. "Almost always from a counterfeit and deadly pill ."

The administrator warned of a new danger: medicine or prescription pills that are counterfeit and contaminated with fentanyl. He said many communities had reported high levels of drug trafficking and sale and increased violent deaths.

This is not a local issue. This is also a national issue. DEA's mission is to protect our communities by fighting criminal drug trafficking networks that attack every corner of the United States with deadly fentanyl he said. "But our work is also about something else. Helping families across the country that we know are grieving the loss of a loved one due to an overdose. A son or a daughter, a mother or a father, a sister or a brother, a friend or a neighbor".

Milgram revealed that since the beginning of August, the government began a search for public security at the national level to combat the crisis of counterfeit pills that drug cartels massively produce in Mexico.

The pills are made to look like natural prescription drugs, such as OxyContin, Vicodin, Percocet, Xanax, and other drugs, said the DEA head.