Very few of the Latin-american nurses. Covid showed just how important they are.

With less than 6%, the Latino the nurses and the health care and education, the experts are trying to extend the capabilities

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Nurses, Luis Medina, in his office in December, he was told that he was positively sick with Covid-19, in order to resist the wearing an oxygen mask. In spite of repeatedly attempted, with the other nurses, they told me that it was hard for him to communicate with the patient, because he spoke Spanish as well.

The 25-year-old Medina, working in a community hospital close to La Mirada, California, and came to the patient, and explained in their mother tongue, the need to wear masks, and as a result of his absence

"Just because of this language barrier, which is in a position to be able to cope with the patient, and eventually, it became even better, and he continues to wear the oxygen mask," said Medina, a graduate and a part-time professor at the Mount of St. Mary's University in Los Angeles.

However, last year was a particularly difficult one, since she had been working as a registered nurse for more than a year, when the coronavirus pandemic broke out. The Medina is used to refer the patients to leave the hospital shortly, at the time of arrival. With Covid-19, and he was convinced that most of his patients, mostly Latinos, it would go by so fast.

The pandemic has disproportionately hit the Clips in the whole country, which is already uncomfortable, as they are more likely to have advanced, work experience, and the highest rates of uninsurance. Liz Guevara, 31, and nursing care manager at La Clinica del Pueblo in the Washington, D.C., and I could see the majority of the hispanic patients during the pandemic, and he concluded that, learn Spanish, and it is of Latin american descent, will help a lot in Washington's life, the great, the Central American population.

The care manager is Elizabeth Guevara's first base camp.Grace Elizabeth Guevara's first base camp

"We have to be responsible. Only a doctor is able to speak Spanish does not mean that the patient is going to talk about the pain," he said. "The patients are even more reluctant to see a doctor if they are able to fully express themselves."

In addition, the language, speech, understanding, traditions, and cultures, and some of the difficulty to pass through the family. Guevara's first base camp, who came to the united states at the age of 6, saying that his parents were struggling to get access to medical care, which led him to the research of the non-health and health care, including the lack of Latin america to the service provider. The recognition of this fact led to his career as a public health nurse. As someone who did not have a mentor when you enter this area, she is passionate about the impact of Latinos, who may be professionals as well as through education and training, and applications.

As a nurse, prices, and can provide more career opportunities than that of a trauma nurse, as long as the nurse is in for a newborn baby-with an average annual salary of $ 75,330 to the presidency, according to the U.S. Labor Statistics.