Virginia, first southern state to end the death penalty: United States:

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source: theguardian

Capital penalty: The state becomes the 23rd in the United States to end this practice, which has been disappearing year by year since the 1990s.

 Last month Virginia's new Democratic majority won the debate during the second year under full control of the constituent gathering when the Senate and the legislators passed bills to check the death sentence.

A signature for history. Virginia Governor Ralph Northam initialed legislation to abolish the death penalty after visiting Jarrett's correctional facility on Wednesday. The conclusion of a chain of declarations and legislation approved since February in this direction. By adopting this text, Virginia became the 23rd American state to stop using the death penalty. Still, only the first among the country's southern states deemed to favor this practice. 

Suppose the text passed quickly through the local parliament, and no executions had taken place since 2017. In that case, this state has a long history with the death penalty. In Jamestown's coastal town, it was there that the first performance of what would later become the United States was recorded. In 1608, Captain George Kendall was shot for his participation in a conspiracy. Ralph Northam said the heart of Virginia's long history. This state has executed more people than any other state. And like other states, Virginia is near to beheading an innocent man. It's time to dump it and move on.

Virginia carried out 65 executions in the 1990s and 32 in the 2000s. It has only executed eight prisoners in the past ten years. A trend that has been confirmed across the country since the turn of the century. Data from the Information Center on the Death Penalty shows that state states executed a total of 7 people in 2020, up from 22 in 2019. Far fewer than the nearly 300 annually in the mid-1990s. Texas executed more than one person last year. 

In a speech, Ralph Northam described how the death penalty was "unfair, ineffective and inhumane. As this Democratic governor recalled, African-Americans represent 79% of prisoners executed in the last century. An additional subject of mobilization for this text, after a year marked by race riots following George Floyd's death.